BBC NEWSBEAT

Spoiler alert: Why people love looking up spoilers

Everyone knows it's bad form to "spoil" a TV show or a film for someone who hasn't seen it by divulging plot details or a surprise twist. But there are some people who go out of their way to read spoilers, devouring Wikipedia synopses with as much enthusiasm as most would have for the source material. Why do they do it? And does it actually spoil the story or make it better?

SHORTLIST

Death threats, fame, and “a bit of magic”: The strange lives of psychic animals who predict the World Cup
 

There are a few certainties during World Cup season – aside from, you know, the football. At some point, you will begin rooting for a team you have absolutely no connection to. Whether you support England or not, if you’re in the UK you’ll get ‘Three Lions’ stuck in your head for weeks. And finally, somewhere in the world there will be an animal oracle predicting the results of each and every game.

THE GUARDIAN

Lonelygirl15: how one mysterious vlogger changed the internet

Bree was a funny, friendly 16-year-old video blogger with a strange family. But all was not what it seemed. Ten years on, we revisit YouTube’s first viral sensation.

The story behind the fake Manchester attack victims

In the wake of the Manchester attack, family members of people genuinely caught up in Monday night’s terror searched desperately for news of their loved ones. Many turned to social media. Collages of the missing were created by people who wanted to help. But as their posts went viral, so did the hoaxes.

Czech Scout on her viral fame: it's important to fight against fascism

When she attended a counter-demonstration at a far-right rally, Lucie Myslíková thought there would be a little bit of publicity from the local press. Now a photograph of the 16-year-old Scout squaring up to a neo-Nazi has been seen by people all over the world.

 

'I cried all the way back': sexual harassment on public transport

How does it feel to be subject to unwanted sexual attention on your morning commute? Or on your way to school? We asked readers to tell us their stories of sexual harassment on public transport.

 

 

 

 

 

Fake tube sign read out on BBC News and in Commons after Westminster attack

 

A London tube sign with a defiant message for terrorists that went viral in the wake of Wednesday’s attack on Westminster was created by an online tube sign generator and never existed in a London underground station.

How a hoax story about betting on Le Pen fooled the internet

This story had all the schadenfreude the internet needed – the only problem is that it was a hoax. There was no bet. But there is a Colin Johnson of Great Yarmouth, whose Facebook pictures of him and one of his sons were published on Mail Online alongside quotes about the story. So how did a fake account end up being linked to a real person?